Create Your Own Diagram-Based Quizzes with Memio

Memio allows you to create quizzes by concealing labels from diagrams.

Memio allows you to create quizzes by concealing labels from diagrams.

Ever since my six-year-old Philip entered 1st Grade, I’ve started creating mock tests based on his textbooks, workbooks, and assignments, to help him prepare for school tests. I use a combination of apps — namely Pages, Keynote, and Skitch — to create these mock tests, but I always find it difficult to create diagrams for labeling exercises.

Fortunately, the developers at Memio.co contacted us about their app: Memio — Memorize Diagram. As the name suggests, it’s designed to help the users memorize diagrams. After trying it out, I can confidently say that it’s helped me create diagram-based quizzes easily and intuitively.

Conceal Terms and Practice Your Memory

To use Memio, you start by importing a diagram that you want to memorize. You can either choose a diagram from your Camera Roll or take a picture with your device’s camera. Then, using your finger, you swipe the labels to conceal them. Once you’ve finished, you will have a cleaned version of the diagram.

Then, you can switch to study mode and practice identifying these labels. If you need to take a peek, you can tap on a concealed label to reveal it. The app doesn’t keep scores; the main purpose of this activity is just to help your memorize diagrams.

You can repeat the practice mode as many times as you like. During each iteration, you can also change which labels you want to conceal/reveal. Simply switch to Edit mode and tap on the marked labels to uncover the text underneath.

Memo comes pre-built with a tutorial that shows you how to do all this in a single diagram. The tutorial nicely shows how you can use Memo to mark a diagram and convert it into a quiz practice.

Once you’ve got the hang of it, you can import as many diagrams as you like. You can also organize them into decks and mark the ones that you need to practice more. You can easily go through the diagrams you’ve marked by tapping the Study button.

Here's a sample diagram I downloaded from the Internet. I concealed some of the labels before handing the diagram over to my kids.

Here's a sample diagram I downloaded from the Internet. I concealed some of the labels before handing the diagram over to my kids.

Parents Need to Know

Memio is designed to be used by all ages. Its ability to transform diagrams into interactive study tools can benefit anyone from first graders to medical school students. You can even use it to create simple flashcards to introduce your toddlers to animals.

After you downloaded or imported all the necessary images you need, you don’t really need an Internet connection to use Memio. Everything is stored locally and can be accessed offline. The app doesn’t have any third-party ads, in-app purchases, or links to social networks.

Keep in mind that because you can basically import any image and convert it into a study tool. For example, you can take a picture with your iPhone and sync it over iCloud Photo Library to your iPad, where Memio is installed. That way, you don’t have to search for images on the Internet.

Update: As of November 2015, Memio is now a Universal app for iPhone, iPad, and iPad Pro. The update also includes new features such as zoom and pan, marker size flexibility, and camera functionality improvements.

Uncovering diagrams is as easy as concealing them. Simply tap on the concealed part -- marked as red -- to remove the cover.

Uncovering diagrams is as easy as concealing them. Simply tap on the concealed part -- marked as red -- to remove the cover.

Things I Like

The way I use Memio is really straightforward. I perform a Google Image search, grab the diagram that I want, and save it to my Camera Roll. Then, I open Memio, import the diagram, and start concealing terms that I want my kids to learn.

I don’t conceal all the terms in a single quiz because the revealed terms can act as contextual hints. Usually, these are very common terms that would be too repetitive for my kids to identify. This approach is also great if the diagram has too many terms. Hiding a different set of terms per quiz allows you to reuse the diagram several times with different emphasis on difficult terms.

Sometimes I also use Memo to take a picture of Philip’s textbooks, workbooks, or written tests. Instead of having to copy them beforehand or even recreate them afterwards, I can simply take a picture of the parts that need more practice, and start creating blanks for Philip to practice as many times as he needs to.

You can create an unlimited number of diagrams and organize them into decks.

You can create an unlimited number of diagrams and organize them into decks.

Conclusion

I’m grateful to find out about Memio. This intuitive and easy-to-use app helps me to present all kinds of diagrams to my kids as small quizzes. I can reuse any printed school materials that my kids need to learn simply by taking a picture and concealing terms. I believe all parents should have a copy of Memio.

Get Memio on the App Store: iPad | iPhone

App was provided for our honest review.